Heroes and Villains (First-Year Writing)

“People who claim that they're evil are usually no worse than the rest of us. It's people who claim that they're good, or anyway better than the rest of us, that you have to be wary of.”  - Wicked   “A villain is just a victim whose story hasn’t been told.” - Once Upon a Time   “She had always found villains more exciting than heroes. They had ambition, passion. They made the stories happen. Villains didn't fear death.” -   Soman Chainani,  The School for Good and Evil

“People who claim that they're evil are usually no worse than the rest of us. It's people who claim that they're good, or anyway better than the rest of us, that you have to be wary of.”
-Wicked

“A villain is just a victim whose story hasn’t been told.”
-Once Upon a Time

“She had always found villains more exciting than heroes. They had ambition, passion. They made the stories happen. Villains didn't fear death.”
- Soman Chainani, The School for Good and Evil

Course description: Pop culture’s latest obsession seems to be retelling the villain’s side of the story, altering tales we thought we knew, and providing us with evil protagonists. In this course, we will examine the idea of what it means to be a hero versus a villain in our culture. We will use these ideas to learn how to construct valid arguments, perform research, and examine arguments from both sides.

Heroes/villains in question: Peter Pan, Captain Hook, The Wicked Witch of the West, The Good Witch of the North, The Wizard of Oz, The Evil Queen, Maleficent, Walter White, Frank Underwood, V, (Milton's) Satan

Required texts:                  
Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West: Gregory McGuire
Peter Pan: J. M. Barrie
Curious Researcher (CR)


 

 

Taught at Belmont University, 2014